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  1. Diners need to freshen up on their produce knowledge

    – As we celebrate British Food Fortnight, research shows diners care about eating seasonal produce, but just 18% can identify in season fruit and veg –

    • 18% of diners are able to identify when fruit and vegetables are in season
    • Over one third (35%) think seasonal menus are important when dining out
    • Over half of the UK (55%) care about where fresh produce is sourced when dining out
    • 40% of diners would re-think their restaurant choice if the produce wasn’t locally sourced
    • Half of diners (50%) would choose a restaurant that grows their own fresh produce over one that dosen’t

    London, 15th September 2016… OpenTable, the world’s leading restaurant booking service, has teamed up with British Food Fortnight (17 September – 2 October) to reveal insight into the UK’s knowledge of British seasonal produce and how it impacts on the restaurant dining experience. A nationwide study by OpenTable reveals that just 18%1 of the country is able to identify when fruit and veg is in season; with almost two thirds (64%) not knowing when British classics such as strawberries and asparagus, are in season.

    Despite this lack of knowledge, over one third (35%) of the UK say seasonal menus are important when dining out. Supporting this claim, a separate study of UK restaurant owners reveals that 94% of diners ask about the use of seasonal produce, with 72% stating customers enquire on a weekly basis. Seasonal produce also appears to be of great importance to UK restaurateurs, with 93% of restaurant owners admitting that it influences how they create their menus.

    The study also highlighted that this lack of knowledge does not discourage Britsh diners from supporting restaurants who use local produce, with half of the UK (50%) stating they would be more inclined to choose a restaurant that grows their own produce, opposed to one that does not. 2 in 5 (41%) also said they would re-think their restaurant choice if the produce wasn’t British sourced.

    The nationwide research revealed that 92% of Brighton residents claim to know the most about seasonal produce while the residents of Edinburgh (67%) admit to knowing the least.

    Adrian Valeriano, Vice President, Europe, OpenTable, comments, “It is fantastic to see this growing trend and insight. It is incredibly important for diners to think about where the food they are enjoying comes from, though it’s interesting to see how unaware we can all be about the provenance of our food. Events like British Food Fortnight are incredibly helpful in raising awareness around local produce, as are the restaurants and chefs that speak so passionately about this cause. It’s our aim to connect diners with the right restaurant for their needs – and for those that care deeply about this, we encourage you to continue asking questions and learining from the great chefs we have on our network.”

    British Food Fortnight is here to encourage growing, cooking, and celebrating home produce and educating the public about the benefits of supporting British farmers.  Alexia Robinson, Founder of British Food Fortnight, comments “There’s definitely more work to be done to achieve a nationwide awareness of British produce, but if diners start factoring this in to all aspects of dining, they’ll not only gain an insight into agriculture, but grow confident in what and when to order at a restaurant for the best possible taste.”

    – ENDS –

    For more information or to talk to an OpenTable spokesperson please contact:

    opentable@housepr.com / 020 7291 3000

     

    www.opentable.co.uk

    www.facebook.com/OpenTableUK

    www.twitter.com/OpenTableUK

     

    Footnotes:

    1. OpenTable proprietary data. OpenTable surveyed 2,000 UK residents between 22nd – 27th July 2016
    2. OpenTable property data. OpenTable survey 250 UK restaurateurs in July 2016

     

    About OpenTable:

     

    OpenTable, part of The Priceline Group (NASDAQ: PCLN), is the world’s leading provider of online restaurant reservations, seating more than 76 million diners in the UK via online bookings across more than 5,100 restaurants. The OpenTable network connects restaurants and diners, helping diners discover and book the perfect table and helping restaurants deliver personalized hospitality to keep guests coming back. The OpenTable service enables diners to see which restaurants have available tables, select a restaurant based on verified diner reviews, menus, and other helpful information, and easily book a reservation.

     

    In addition to the company’s website and mobile apps, OpenTable powers online reservations for nearly 600 partners, including many of the Internet’s most popular global and local brands. For restaurants, the OpenTable hospitality solutions enable them to manage their reservation book, streamline their operations, and enhance their service levels. Since its inception in 1998, OpenTable has seated over 1 billion diners around the world.  OpenTable is headquartered in San Francisco and available throughout the United States, as well as in Australia, Canada, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Mexico, and the UK.

     

    About British Food Fortnight:

     

    British Food Fortnight is the annual celebration of the diverse and delicious food that Britain produces. It was founded in 2002 response to the foot and mouth crisis in order to encourage the public to support British farmers and food producers. Hundreds of shops, pubs, and restaurants take part every year with special menus and promotions. The event is also an established date on the school calendar, with many schools using it as an opportunity to teach children about food. It is organised by Love British Food, a small independent organisation that educates consumers, retailers and caterers about the benefits of buying British.

  2. The rise of the concept restaurant

    Popularity of concept restaurants amongst diners is increasing, but is the food or the idea the main attraction?

    • 95% of restaurant owners report seeing a rise in concept restaurants in the UK
    • Concept restaurants are on the rise with over half of the UK having visited one
    • Nearly half (44%) of restaurateurs consider themselves to be a concept restaurant
    • Restaurateurs believe the rise in concept restaurants is due to diners wanting an entire leisure experience, not just a great meal
    • 70% of restaurateurs believe concept restaurants will continue to rise
    • One third (33%) of restaurateurs believe every restaurant should have a concept
    • 2 in 5 diners agree that concept restaurants provide a more enjoyable experience
    • 88% of restaurateurs believe the quality of food sometimes suffers in concept restaurants

    London, 22 August 2016… New research by OpenTable, the world’s leading restaurant booking service, has found that 95%1 of restaurateurs have seen a rise in concept restaurants in the UK, and a further 70% believe the phenomenon will continue to rise. But what really defines a concept restaurant? Is it offering an interactive experience like Inamo’s touch screen menu, an experiential offering like The Bunyadi where you dine naked or Dinner by Heston Blumenthal that explores the history its food derived from?

    From those restaurateurs surveyed, nearly half (44%)1 consider themselves to be a concept restaurant and one third (33%) believe that every restaurant should have a concept. The conclusion that the restaurant industry has come to is that diners now want an entire leisure experience, rather than just a great meal. Though industry experts clearly do worry about their food standards as a consequence, as 88% of the restaurants surveyed admitted they believe that the quality of food can sometimes suffer in a concept restaurant.

    From a consumer perspective, the most likely reason behind visiting a concept restaurant would be for a special occasion, hence choosing a restaurant option that offers something a little different. Over half (51%)2 of UK diners admit to having visited a concept restaurant and 2 in 5 agree that concept restaurants offer a more enjoyable experience. In contrast to the thoughts of restaurateurs, the majority of UK diners (28%) believe the best concepts are those which derive from the food offering, which isn’t surprising as 80% think the quality of food is the most important factor of the dining experience.

    A further one quarter (24%) of British diners believe the best concept restaurants provide an immersive experience; while 13% chose those restaurants that experiment with food. Faced with a list of new concept restaurant ideas, Brits voted a restaurant that offers a different chef every week, as the concept restaurant they would most like to visit.  Coming in second was a restaurant which only serves alcoholic food; and third was a restaurant where you only pay for how long you stay.

    Adrian Valeriano, Vice President, Europe, OpenTable, comments, “The restaurant industry is ever changing and we are constantly seeing new and more diverse concepts launching. With an increasingly competitive landscape and more discerning diner base, the need for restaurants to differentiate their offering through a unique and compelling story will only continue to grow. Concept restaurants have a dual role to fulfill both in terms of the quality of their food and the experience that they deliver, to ensure longevity.”

    Sebastian Lyall, founder of The Bunyadi, the UK’s first naked restaurant, and food and beverage concepts company, Lollipop, comments “We are all about creating unique and immersive concepts. Our audience expects the best and this makes us increasingly mindful of every single detail in the projects we execute. It is this attention that helps us to navigate the challenge of ensuring repeat visits to our pop up sites, and carrying our audience with us into every new adventure with excitement and enthusiasm. Our pop ups also enable us to test and iterate concepts before investing in a more permanent site. It is fantastic to see the growth of concept dining with restaurants really focusing on the story that makes them unique, and seeing how diners respond to this.”

    – ENDS –

    For more information or to talk to an OpenTable spokesperson please contact:

    opentable@housepr.com / 020 7291 3000

     

    www.opentable.co.uk

    www.facebook.com/OpenTableUK

    www.twitter.com/OpenTableUK

     

    Footnotes:

    1. OpenTable property data. OpenTable survey 250 UK restaurateurs in July 2016
    1. OpenTable proprietary data. OpenTable surveyed 2,000 UK residents between 22nd – 27th July 2016

     

    About OpenTable:

     

    OpenTable, part of The Priceline Group (NASDAQ: PCLN), is the world’s leading provider of online restaurant reservations, since its inception in 1998, OpenTable has seated more than 1 billion diners around the world, seating more than 19 million diners per month via online bookings across more than 37,000 restaurants. The OpenTable network connects restaurants and diners, helping diners discover and book the perfect table and helping restaurants deliver personalized hospitality to keep guests coming back. The OpenTable service enables diners to see which restaurants have available tables, select a restaurant based on verified diner reviews, menus, and other helpful information, and easily book a reservation. Since its introduction in 2008, the OpenTable Reviews program has generated more than 40 million reviews by verified diners. OpenTable diner contribute more than 750,000 restaurant reviews each month.

    OpenTable has seated more than 338 million diners worldwide through its mobile solutions, representing more than $13 billion in revenue for OpenTable restaurant customers. In addition to the company’s website and mobile apps, OpenTable powers online reservations for nearly 600 partners, including Google, TripAdvisor, Bing, Yahoo!, Zagat and Eater. For restaurants, the OpenTable hospitality solutions enable them to manage their reservation book, streamline their operations, and enhance their service levels.  OpenTable is headquartered in San Francisco and available throughout the United States, as well as in Australia, Canada, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Mexico, and the UK.

     

  3. Food envy causes unrest at the dinner table

    • Over 3 million (3,790,920) diners admit they suffer from food envy on a regular basis
    • Almost one quarter (23%) of the UK admit food envy has caused an argument between partners and friends
    • Over one third (35%) of Brits would steal their partner’s / friend’s dish to satisfy their food envy
    • One in five women admit they are most likely to suffer from food envy when they are on a diet; while 19% of men feel it is when they decide to order something adventurous
    • Almost one quarter (22%) of diners say food envy causes drooling from the mouth and almost 1 in 10 complain of an increased heart rate
    • Dr David Lewis, Neuropsychologist identifies three food envy personality types

    London, 1st July 2016… New research from OpenTable, the world’s leading restaurant booking service, has found that a staggering three million (3,790,920)1 indecisive Brits experience food envy on a regular basis, and it is leading to unrest at the dinner table.

    With over half (54%) of diners admitting to having experienced food envy, Neuropsychologist Dr David Lewis comments “If the look and smell of another person’s meal arouses emotions that are more positive than their own choice the results can be envy, frustration and regret.” As a result, jealous Brits are unabashed in coveting a fellow diner’s meal with over a third (35%) shamelessly admitting they would steal their friend or partner’s meal to overcome their envy.

    Furthermore, almost one quarter (23%) of those asked admit that food envy has caused an argument between partners and friends. Dr David Lewis shares “With an abundance of choice on restaurant menus it’s no surprise that friction between couples/friends can arise. As humans we have formed a carnal relationship with food, not only does it help us to survive, but we derive immense pleasure from the act of eating and we’re protective of this.”

    The study also revealed the physical symptoms diners are most likely to experience from food envy, which includes drooling from the mouth (22%) and even complaints of an increased heart rate (9%). Dr. David Lewis says, “These are produced by what doctors’ term sympathetic arousal and refers to part of the nervous system over which we have little or no control. In addition to increased heart rate we sweat a little more, breathe more rapidly and focus our all attention on what has stimulated these physiological changes – the other’s mouth-wateringly tasty meal!”

    Over a fifth of women cited they are most likely to suffer with food envy when they are on a diet; while (19%) men feel it is when they decide to order something adventurous. Dr David Lewis continues “With only a brief menu description to guide them, diners must rely on their cognitive skills while making food choices. When the meal arrives however, they rate the soundness of their choice emotionally. So, regardless of your discipline, you’re likely to give in to desire”

    Of the cuisines most likely to summon your green-eyed monster, Italian food seems to be most lusted after as 22% of diners cite this as the cuisine most likely to cause food envy.

    Adrian Valeriano, Vice President, Europe, OpenTable, comments “Understandably, the abundance in choice on today’s restaurant menus can mean diners are left in a quandary over what to order. If you know you have a history of stealing a friend’s fries, drooling over your dates’ dessert or regularly experience the symptoms of food envy, why not opt for the ‘share more, taste more’ philosophy and order sharing plates for the table, that way you get a taste of everything and eliminate any feelings of jealousy that could affect your dining experience.” 

    Dr David Lewis identifies three categories of decision-making styles that determine an individual’s tendency to experience food envy “The likelihood of suffering from food envy depends on an individual’s decision-making style. This falls into one of three categories: Risk Avoider, Risk Taker and Risk Hedger.

    Risk Avoiders make their food choices cautiously and conservatively so as to avoid later regret. They order familiar dishes they have enjoyed in the past.  Playing it safe can, however, result in food envy when they see the dishes ordered by their more adventurous companions.

    Risk Takers are optimists who always expect to win big. When dining out they often choose dishes that involve more than a little risk and uncertainty. If their choice is delicious their more cautious dining companions are likely to experience food envy. But if the dish fails to live up to expectations, it is the Risk Taker who becomes envious of the safer food choices of others.

    Risk Hedgers try to combine the best chance of enjoying success with the least risk of failure. They typically select dishes that are somewhat unfamiliar and slightly adventurous but neither too strange nor too exotic. As a result, they can be the most prone to food envy with the choices of both Risk Avoiders and Risk Takers appearing tastier and more desirable than their own!”

    Take your time studying the menu, especially if the style of food is unfamiliar to you. Never allow yourself to be rushed into making a hasty choice by social pressure and always be ready to seek advice from waiters.”

    – ENDS –

    For more information or to talk to an OpenTable spokesperson please contact:

    opentable@housepr.com / 020 7291 3000

     

    www.opentable.co.uk

    www.facebook.com/OpenTableUK

    www.twitter.com/OpenTableUK

     

    Footnotes:

    1. Calculated by the ONS UK population estimate of 64.1m combined with an OpenTable survey of 2,000 UK residents between 7th – 11th January 2016
    2. OpenTable proprietary data. OpenTable surveyed 2,000 UK residents between UK residents between 7th – 11th January 2016

     

     

    About OpenTable:

     

    OpenTable, part of The Priceline Group (NASDAQ: PCLN), is the world’s leading provider of online restaurant reservations, seating more than 72 million diners across 4,900 restaurants in UK, using OpenTable technology and bookable via opentable.co.uk and mobile apps. The OpenTable network connects restaurants and diners, helping diners discover and book the perfect table and helping restaurants deliver personalized hospitality to keep guests coming back. The OpenTable service enables diners to see which restaurants have available tables, select a restaurant based on verified diner reviews, menus, and other helpful information, and easily book a reservation. In addition to the company’s website and mobile apps, OpenTable powers online reservations for nearly 600 partners, including many of the Internet’s most popular global and local brands. For restaurants, the OpenTable hospitality solutions enable them to manage their reservation book, streamline their operations, and enhance their service levels. Since its inception in 1998, OpenTable has seated more than 1 billion diners around the world.  OpenTable is headquartered in San Francisco and available throughout the United States, as well as in Australia, Canada, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Mexico, and the UK.

     

  4. OpenTable reveals Top 100 Fit for Foodies restaurants

    London, June 28 2016… OpenTable, the world’s leading provider of online restaurant bookings, has today announced the 2016 Top 100 Fit for Foodies restaurants in the UK. This annual list reflects the combined opinions of more than 300,000 reviews submitted by verified OpenTable diners at more than 4,900 restaurants across the UK.

    This year’s top ranking restaurant, Prithvi, based in Cheltenham, beat out stiff competition from the nation’s top culinary hotspots. Prithvi received their award at Restaurant Magazine’s National Restaurant Awards Ceremony on Monday 27th June 2016.

    The Top 10 Fit for Foodies honourees, in order are:

    1. Prithvi, Cheltenham
    2. The Chef’s Table, Chester
    3. The French Table, London
    4. Peckham Bazaar, London
    5. The Art School Restaurant, Liverpool
    6. The Gardeners Cottage, Edinburgh
    7. Typing Room, London
    8. Restaurant Story, London
    9. The Dairy Bar & Bistro, London
    10. Food for Friends, Brighton

    Adrian Valeriano, Vice President, Europe, OpenTable, comments “OpenTable diners are the true detectives of what really makes a dining experience, great. Their continuous and combined feedback from all over the country reveals some of the best restaurants for all ‘foodie fanatics’ out there. Each restaurant has literally brought something new to the table and impressed our diners with their culinary creativity.”

    The following restaurants, listed in alphabetical order, show the complete Top 100 Fit for Foodies restaurants in the UK according to OpenTable diners. The list may also be viewed at http://www.opentable.co.uk/m/best-restaurants-for-foodies-2016/.

    2016 Top 100 Fit for Foodies restaurants in the UK (in alphabetical order):

    21, Newcastle

    Albert’s Didsbury, Manchester

    Albert’s Shed, Manchester

    Alston Bar & Beef, Glasgow

    Alyn Williams at The Westbury, London

    Angels with Bagpipes, Edinburgh

    Antico, London

    Baltic, London

    Benares, London

    Blackfriars Restaurant, Newcastle

    Bocca Di Lupo, London

    Bourgee, Southend-On-Sea

    Café Murano – St James, London

    Cafe Spice Namaste, London

    Chapter One, London

    Charlotte’s Place, London

    Chez Bruce, London

    Clos Maggiore, London

    Coppi, Belfast

    Dinner by Heston Blumenthal, London

    Dylan’s Menai Bridge, Menai Bridge

    Dylan’s Restaurant Criccieth, Criccieth

    EDWINS, London

    Fera at Claridge’s, London

    Flesh & Buns, London

    Food for Friends, Brighton

    Gauthier Soho, London

    Gyoza Bar, London

    Harwood Arms, London

    Hawksmoor Air Street, London

    Hawksmoor Manchester, Manchester

    Hawksmoor Seven Dials, London

    Hawksmoor Spitalfields, London

    Hibiscus, London

    Hickory’s Chester, Chester

    Hickory’s Rhos-on-Sea, Rhos-on-Sea

    Hickory’s West Kirby, West Kirby

    Iberica Farringdon, London

    Jinjuu Soho Limited, London

    Kendell’s Bistro, Leeds

    La Trompette, London

    Lima Fitzrovia, London

    Little Social, London

    LOBOS Meat & Tapas, London

    L’Ortolan, Shinfield

    Lussmanns, St. Albans

    Magdalen, London

    MAGGIES GRILL, Aberdeen

    Marcus, London

    Medlar, London

    Murakami, London

    Murano, London

    NOPI, London

    NOPI – Downstairs, London

    Ottolenghi Islington, London

    Ottolenghi Spitalfields, London

    Outlaw’s at The Capital, London

    Peckham Bazaar, London

    Petrus, London

    Pint Shop, Cambridge

    Pintura, Leeds

    Pollen Street Social, London

    Portland Restaurant, London

    Prime Steak & Grill, St. Albans

    Prithvi, Cheltenham

    Restaurant Gordon Ramsay, London

    Restaurant Story London, London

    Rok, London

    Roux at The Landau, London

    Smiths Restaurant Wapping, London

    Social Eating House, London

    Spring Restaurant, London

    Taberna Do Mercado, London

    Texture Restaurant, London

    The 10 Cases – Bistrot à Vin, London

    The Art School Restaurant, Liverpool

    The Broad Chare, Newcastle

    The Butchershop Bar & Grill, Glasgow

    The Cambridge Chop House, Cambridge

    The Chefs Table, Chester

    The Chesil Rectory, Winchester

    The Dairy Bar & Bistro, London

    The French Table, London

    The Gardeners Cottage, Edinburgh

    The Glasshouse, London

    The Greenhouse, London

    The Hinds Head – Bray, Bray

    The Laughing Gravy, London

    The Ledbury, London

    The Quality Chop House , London

    The Westwood Restaurant, Beverley

    Theo Randall at the InterContinental, London

    THOMPSON St Albans, St. Albans

    Twenty, Princes Street, Grill & Smokehouse, Edinburgh

    Typing Room, London

    Vanilla Black, London

    Webbe’s at The Fish Café, Rye

    Wright Brothers Borough, London

    Yama Momo, London

    Yauatcha City, London

    —- ENDS —-

    For more information or to talk to an OpenTable spokesperson please contact:

     

    opentable@housepr.com / 020 7291 3000

     

    www.opentable.co.uk

    www.facebook.com/OpenTableUK

    www.twitter.com/OpenTableUK

  5. “Going Dutch” could cost diners almost £39,000 over a lifetime

    -More than the average UK housing deposit-

    • 2 in 3 diners will split the bill when dining out, despite fearing losing out on money
    • One third (34%) split the bill because they don’t want others to think they’re tight
    • On average, splitting the bill means possibly losing out on £8.73 per meal; meaning a potential loss of £38,782 over a lifetime
    • 42% of restaurant owners said splitting the bill impacts gratuity; decreasing the amount consumers give

    London, 24th May 2016OpenTable, the world’s leading restaurant booking service, has found that while 2 in 3 Brits are happy to split the bill equally when dining out,1  it could mean that diners are potential losing out on a large sum of money over their lifetime.

    The study revealed that over one third (38%) of the UK feel they lose out on money when splitting the bill. On average estimating they lose out on £8.73 every time they dine out; meaning a potential loss of £38,782 over a lifetime of bill splitting.2 This loss equates to more than the average house deposit in the UK (£33K).3

    Over half (58%) of diners questioned admitted they agree to split the bill equally because of ease of payment. While one third (34%) will “go Dutch” because they don’t want others to think they’re tight with money.

    It seems the top reasons Brits avoid splitting the bill are; when their fellow diners have ordered a number of alcoholic drinks (54%), when others have ordered more food (49%) or if they are not dining with close friends (27%).

    So how does splitting the bill effect restaurants? Almost one quarter (23%) of UK diners said splitting the bill impacts the gratuity they give. OpenTable also surveyed restaurateurs to discover how customers going Dutch impacts their business. 42% of restaurant owners said splitting the bill did impact gratuity and actually decreases the amount consumers give.4 However, the majority of restaurants seem happy to accommodate the requirements of their diners, as 30% admitted they make it deliberately easy for their guests to split their bill.

    Adrian Valeriano, Vice President, Europe, OpenTable, comments, “Splitting up the bill after a meal out can sometimes cause a real divide within dining groups. And while it might save on time and avoid the hassle of calculating what you owe, it appears both consumers and restauranteurs are potentially losing out when diners opt to ‘go Dutch’. It seems consumers are left feeling out of pocket, while restaurants are indeed noticing the impact it has on gratuity.”

    – ENDS –

    For more information or to talk to an OpenTable spokesperson please contact:

    emma@housepr.com / 020 7291 3030

    abbie@housepr.com / 020 7291 3041

     

    www.opentable.co.uk

    www.facebook.com/OpenTableUK

    www.twitter.com/OpenTableUK

  6. Brits want to ban phone use at restaurant tables

    Diners fed up with phones at the table and would welcome a no phone zone whilst eating

    • 90% of Brits find it rude when others use their phones during a meal1
    • On average Brits spend 7 minutes on their phone every time they dine out
    • 41% post images of their food onto social media channels
    • 1 in 10 diners post meals on social media to give the impression they lead an indulgent lifestyle
    • Interview & comment from food critic and broadcaster Grace Dent

    London, 29th April 2016… New research by OpenTable, the world’s leading restaurant booking service, has found that despite the UK being a nation of social media advocates, British diners are becoming increasingly frustrated at the use of mobile phones during a meal. 9 in 10 Brits admit they find it rude when others use their phones during a meal, while a further three quarters (83%) of the UK would welcome a ‘no phone zone’ in restaurants.

    While mobile technology continues to be a necessary resource for improving the dining experience; allowing foodies to discover new restaurants and share their experiences – Brits are increasingly protective of its impact whilst at the restaurant table. OpenTable research reveals that two thirds (66%) of the UK will use their mobile phone at the table when dining and, of those that do, 41% would post images of their food on social media.

    The study also looked at how much of their meal time diners are wasting on their mobiles; revealing that on average they spend 7 minutes on their phone every time they dine out, equating to 573 hours of neglecting their fellow diners over a lifetime.2 It appears women are more addicted to their phones with 71% admitting to using it at the table, compared to 60% of men.

    A further sign of our increasing reliance on social media was proven by one third (32%) of the UK admitting to asking for a restaurant’s Wi-Fi password before they even order their meal, while 40% would not to go to a restaurant if it didn’t have Wi-Fi. One fifth (18%) admit to posting a meal on social media to make their followers envious, while 1 in 10 do it to give the impression they lead an indulgent lifestyle.

    Insight from restaurateurs further supports these results as they reveal that a quarter (25%) of their guests interrupt a meal to take photos of their group, food and the restaurant. Restaurant owners are embracing this demand with almost three quarters (83%) encouraging guests to post about and share the experience via their social media channels.

    Adrian Valeriano, Vice President, Europe, OpenTable, comments, “Mobile phones and social media are now a central part of both our professional and social lives, so it isn’t surprising to see that diners are using their mobiles at the dinner table more than ever. It’s fair to say that in recent years the restaurant industry has had to adapt to this change in dining behaviour, but you would be hard-pushed to find an establishment that had a problem with it. However, if diners are serious about wanting no-phone zones, it will be fascinating to see whether restaurants adopt it.”

     Grace Dent, Food Critic and Broadcaster, comments, “I am definitely guilty of using social media at a restaurant dining table and I don’t see a problem with sharing the odd snap of your meal here and there. However, it’s fair to say the trend for ‘food porn’ is impacting on the pleasure of the dining experience. As a result we’re all guilty of forgetting basic social manners and so I think it’s important to establish a greater sense of etiquette and decorum at the restaurant table.”

    Some of Grace’s tips include:

    • We all use various technology and social media to book and discover new restaurants but once sat opposite your dining partner, remember you’re there to be with them.
    • Prioritise conversation. If someone’s more interested in being on their phone than being with you, it’s time to get the cheque.
    • Food first, filter later. Get in and get out, if you’re desperate to document and upload your food then make sure you document it quickly and labour over uploading it later.
    • Don’t insist on involving your fellow diners in a social media brag. If your guest doesn’t want to be snapped mid-gorge, then respect that fact.
    • Never, ever, let someone’s social media snapping get in the way of enjoying your food. If they want to photograph your dish, they should have ordered it.
    • Rearrange the table at your peril. Not only does it invite judgement from your fellow diners, but you’ll look like Lawrence Llewelyn-Bowen shifting furniture on Changing Rooms.

    – ENDS –

    For more information or to talk to an OpenTable spokesperson please contact:

    emma@housepr.com / 020 7291 3030

    abbie@housepr.com / 020 7291 3041

     

    www.opentable.co.uk

    www.facebook.com/OpenTableUK

    www.twitter.com/OpenTableUK

  7. Diners and Restaurants embrace menu hacking

    Brits become nation of ‘LA Eaters’ as OpenTable charts increase in off-menu ordering

    • Over half (56%) the UK adapt dishes on restaurant menus to suit their tastes1
    • Almost a third (28%) order completely off-menu at a restaurant
    • 93% of UK restaurants will now accommodate ordering off-menu
    • 8m (15%) of British women adapt menu dishes in order to make them healthier
    • 80% of UK restaurants are seeing an increase in diners ordering off-menu

    London, 7th April 2016… New research by OpenTable, the world’s leading restaurant booking service, has uncovered an interesting change in the ordering habits of British foodies. Inspired by our American counterparts, almost a third (28%) of the UK now reveal they like to order completely off-menu at a restaurant.

    Known as ‘menu hacking’ a growing demand for a bespoke experience has seen a rise in menu customisation, with over half (56%) the UK adapting a dish on a restaurant menu to suit their taste. The majority (38%) of diners also admit that when craving a specific dish, they would rather visit a restaurant they love and order off-menu than try out somewhere new.

    With over half (57%) of diners believing it is their right to order food off-menu, UK restaurants are going out of their way to oblige diners. A recent survey of UK restaurateurs revealed that an impressive 94% of restaurants would accommodate a guest’s requirements and requests, in order to encourage loyalty to their restaurant. A further 80% of restaurants backed this growing trend by admitted to seeing an increase in diners ordering dishes that are not on the restaurant menu, or changing a dish that is on the menu.2

    The Savoy’s Executive Chef Holger Jackisch commented “We will do anything we can to meet a guest’s request and to ensure they have the best experience they can at Kaspar’s Seafood Bar & Grill (The Savoy). We always say “If we have the ingredients in house we will move mountains to make it happen”. We mostly have guests omitting butter, gluten and dairy for health/allergy reasons. Our menu is fairly extensive, but guests also ask us to create classic dishes from our premium A La Carte items such as Dover Sole Meunière, Lobster Thermidor and an array of risottos. Being able to accommodate these requirements helps create a higher level of loyalty as a lot of these requests come from our regulars.”

    The most frequently removed items on restaurant menus include sauce (11%), mushrooms (10%) and meat (8%) while the principle motivation is a dislike for certain ingredients (56%), followed by enjoying adding extras (22%) and a lack of menu choice (15%).

    The research also showed that women are less abashed when making requests to change their order, with 59% of women proud to do so in comparison to 52% of men. As many as 4.8m (15%) women admit to altering menu dishes in order to make them healthier while 30% of men adapt their dish as they enjoy adding extras.

    Mike Xenakis, Managing Director at OpenTable, comments, “It is refreshing to see British restaurants accommodating the expansive tastes of diners in the UK. At OpenTable we celebrate the growing trend of menu hacking and encourage diners to experiment and try new ways of eating their favourite foods, at the restaurants they love.”

    —- ENDS —-

    For more information or to talk to an OpenTable spokesperson please contact:

    emma@housepr.com / 020 7291 3030

    abbie@housepr.com / 020 7291 3041

     

    www.opentable.co.uk

    www.facebook.com/OpenTableUK

    www.twitter.com/OpenTableUK

     

    Footnotes:

    1. OpenTable proprietary data. OpenTable surveyed 2,000 UK residents between 7th – 11th January 2016
    2. OpenTable property data. OpenTable survey 250 UK restaurateurs in March 2016

     

    About OpenTable:

     

    OpenTable, part of The Priceline Group (NASDAQ: PCLN), is the world’s leading provider of online restaurant reservations, seating more than 18 million diners per month via online bookings across more than 36,000 restaurants. The OpenTable network connects restaurants and diners, helping diners discover and book the perfect table and helping restaurants deliver personalized hospitality to keep guests coming back. The OpenTable service enables diners to see which restaurants have available tables, select a restaurant based on verified diner reviews, menus, and other helpful information, and easily book a reservation. In addition to the company’s website and mobile apps, OpenTable powers online reservations for nearly 600 partners, including many of the Internet’s most popular global and local brands. For restaurants, the OpenTable hospitality solutions enable them to manage their reservation book, streamline their operations, and enhance their service levels. Since its inception in 1998, OpenTable has seated more than 1 billion diners around the world.  OpenTable is headquartered in San Francisco and available throughout the United States, as well as in Australia, Canada, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Mexico, and the UK.

     

  8. Restaurateurs see growth in bar dining

    • Almost one fifth of restaurants that do not currently have a bar are looking to invest in one
    • 55% of diners would go to a restaurant specifically for their bar menu
    • A quarter of diners would dine in a high-priced restaurant’s bar area before deciding to invest in a meal in the restaurant
    • 61% of diners are more likely to visit a restaurant if it has a welcoming bar area

    London, 9 March 2016… New research by OpenTable, the world’s leading restaurant booking service, highlights the growing popularity of bar side dining, as well as reporting a rise in UK restaurateurs investing in bar areas and menus.

    The survey of more than 1,300 UK diners and restaurateurs revealed that 81% of consumers enjoy bar dining and 61% would be more likely to visit a restaurant if it had a welcoming bar area. Over half of diners (55%) would even visit a restaurant specifically for their bar menu. Additionally, a quarter of diners (26%) would prefer to dine in a high-priced restaurants bar area before deciding to invest in a meal in the restaurant.

    This diner behaviour may explain why almost one fifth (19%) of restaurants that do not currently house a bar are looking to invest in one. The key incentives highlighted for this appetite to invest were the ability to offer a varied price point menu, provide a different experience for customers and host private parties.

    A further reason restaurants are investing in their bar area is to try and keep guests in their restaurant for a longer period. With 68% of diners admitting they would be more likely to spend the entire evening in one location if the restaurant offered a great bar area, this may be a wise move.

    Of those restaurants surveyed that currently have a bar, 65% either have, or are planning to invest in the area in the next 12 months and almost half (49%) of restaurateurs with a bar are planning on increasing their marketing to promote bar dining in the next 12 months.

    As well as investing in the area itself, it appears the majority (67%) of restaurateurs are also investing in the bar menu. The main motivations for this are to test menu concepts, offer a varied price point, offer a different menu, stay ahead of trends and to remain competitive.

    Mike Xenakis, Managing Director at OpenTable, comments, “The trend for bar dining is something we have seen coming through in our discussions with our restaurant partners over the past few months, and it’s interesting to see that the wider dining community is tapping into this too. A great bar area not only acts as the gateway to a restaurant but is an area where chefs can test menu concepts and stay ahead of the trends.”

    —- ENDS —-

    For more information or to talk to an OpenTable spokesperson please contact:

    emma@housepr.com / 020 7291 3030

    abbie@housepr.com / 020 7291 3041

     

    www.opentable.co.uk

    www.facebook.com/OpenTableUK

    www.twitter.com/OpenTableUK

     

    Footnotes:

    1. OpenTable proprietary data. OpenTable surveyed more than 1,300 UK diners and restaurateurs in January 2016

    About OpenTable:

    OpenTable, part of The Priceline Group (NASDAQ: PCLN), is the world’s leading provider of online restaurant reservations, seating more than 17 million diners per month via online bookings across more than 33,000 restaurants. The OpenTable network connects restaurants and diners, helping diners discover and book the perfect table and helping restaurants deliver personalized hospitality to keep guests coming back. The OpenTable service enables diners to see which restaurants have available tables, select a restaurant based on verified diner reviews, menus, and other helpful information, and easily book a reservation. In addition to the company’s website and mobile apps, OpenTable powers online reservations for nearly 600 partners, including many of the Internet’s most popular global and local brands. For restaurants, the OpenTable hospitality solutions enable them to manage their reservation book, streamline their operations, and enhance their service levels. Since its inception in 1998, OpenTable has seated more than 940 million diners around the world.  OpenTable is headquartered in San Francisco and available throughout the United States, as well as in Canada, Germany, Japan, Mexico, and the UK.

  9. Turning the tables: Women take control of Valentine’s dating

    • 1 in 4 men fail to book their Valentine’s Day restaurant due to leaving it too late²
    • 38% of women resort to booking the romantic meal themselves on Valentine’s Day²
    • Londoners are the region most likely to book more than two months in advance²
    • The earliest Valentine’s Day booking for 2016 was a year in advance¹
    • OpenTable releases top 10 romantic restaurants in London, Manchester, Birmingham, Glasgow and Edinburgh

    London, 2 February 2016… New data from OpenTable, the world’s leading restaurant booking service, has revealed that Brits will need to get a move on this Valentine’s Day if they’re planning to win the heart of their loved one with a romantic meal. With restaurant bookings rising up to 119% on Valentine’s Day compared to an average day, and OpenTable’s earliest 2016 booking made a year in advance, those that aren’t quick off the mark may find themselves queueing in the cold.

    With continuing strong demand for Valentine’s Day, Brits are sitting on a romantic time bomb when it comes to leaving their reservation to the last minute. And the stakes are high with two thirds of women in favour of a romantic meal over a bouquet of flowers on this special day.

    Despite this fact, 1 in 4 men (26%) admit failing to book their Valentine’s Day restaurant due to leaving it too late. As a result, a growing number of dissatisfied ladies are taking care of the details with research showing more than 38% of women make the booking themselves. Although this modern approach still leaves most men footing the bill with only 1 in 10 women being happy to pick up the tab.

    Londoners, the nation’s foodie capital, are drawing the shortest straw with the region being most likely to book more than two months in advance.

    Further insight into the nation’s V-Day dining habits shows that 1 in 10 reservations were for tables of more than two, a sign of the rising popularity in anti-Valentine’s Day group celebrations. The research also revealed that 90% of diners were first time visitors to the restaurant they booked. Brits appear to play it safe when choosing the cuisine. Italian food comes in as the top choice for diners on Valentine’s Day (14%), next up are UK favourites Chinese (12%) and Indian (9%).

    Mike Xenakis, Managing Director at OpenTable, comments, “Valentine’s Day is one of the most popular times of the year for dining and it’s easy to be caught off guard when it comes to booking your restaurant of choice. With our earliest reservations starting a year in advance, we’ve tried to take the pain out of booking by compiling a lists of the most romantic restaurants in the UK, to ensure you don’t miss the boat.”

    To help you decide where to take your Valentine, the restaurant experts at OpenTable have rounded up the top 10 most romantic restaurants in London, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Manchester and Birmingham, based on diner feedback:

    Birmingham
    Restaurant Cuisine
    Anderson’s Bar & Grill English
    Pasta di Piazza Italian
    Buonissimo Restaurant Italian
    Edmunds French
    Turners Restaurant International
    Cielo Restaurant Italian
    Fleet Street Kitchen British
    The Fountain Inn at Clent British
    The Shrewsbury Arms English
    Asha’s Restaurant Indian
    Edinburgh
    Restaurant Cuisine
    The Stockbridge Restaurant Scottish
    Monteiths British
    Angels with Bagpipes Scottish
    Blackfriars British
    Twenty, Princes Street, Grill & Smokehouse Steakhouse
    The Cellar Door Scottish
    Contini Cannonball Scottish
    WHISKI Rooms Bar & Bistro Scottish
    C~shack Seafood
    Victor & Carina Contini Ristorante Italian
    Glasgow
    Restaurant Cuisine
    Number 16 Restaurant Modern European
    The Butchershop Bar & Grill Steakhouse
    Hutchesons Bar & Brasserie Scottish
    Italian Caffe Italian
    Rogano Seafood
    The Sisters Kelvingrove Scottish
    The Grill Room at the Square Steakhouse
    Alston Bar & Beef Steak
    Mini Grill International
    Urban Bar & Brasserie British
    London
    Restaurant Cuisine
    Clos Maggiore French
    Gauthier Soho French
    City Social – Restaurant Contemporary European
    Galvin at Windows French
    Restaurant Gordon Ramsay Contemporary French
    Typing Room Modern European
    The Greenhouse French
    The Glasshouse Modern European
    Petrus French
    The Ledbury Contemporary European
    Manchester
    Restaurant Cuisine
    Tattu Restaurant & Bar Chinese
    63 Degrees French
    Rosso Restaurant Italian
    The Cherry Tree British
    Gaucho Manchester Steak
    Velvet British
    La Bandera Spanish
    47 King Street West British
    Hawksmoor Manchester British
    Iberica Manchester Spanish

     

    —- ENDS —-

    For more information or to talk to an OpenTable spokesperson please contact:

    emma@housepr.com / 020 7291 3030

    abbie@housepr.com / 020 7291 3041

     

    www.opentable.co.uk

    www.facebook.com/OpenTableUK

    www.twitter.com/OpenTableUK

     

    Footnotes:

    1. OpenTable data based on Valentine’s Day 2015
    2. OpenTable propriety data. OpenTable surveyed 2,000 UK residents between 7th January – 11th January 2016
    3. OpenTable Valentine’s survey of 2,000 adults was carried out by OnePoll between 3rd February and 5th February 2014

    About OpenTable:

    OpenTable, part of The Priceline Group (NASDAQ: PCLN), is the world’s leading provider of online restaurant reservations, seating more than 17 million diners per month via online bookings across more than 33,000 restaurants. The OpenTable network connects restaurants and diners, helping diners discover and book the perfect table and helping restaurants deliver personalized hospitality to keep guests coming back. The OpenTable service enables diners to see which restaurants have available tables, select a restaurant based on verified diner reviews, menus, and other helpful information, and easily book a reservation. In addition to the company’s website and mobile apps, OpenTable powers online reservations for nearly 600 partners, including many of the Internet’s most popular global and local brands. For restaurants, the OpenTable hospitality solutions enable them to manage their reservation book, streamline their operations, and enhance their service levels. Since its inception in 1998, OpenTable has seated more than 940 million diners around the world.  OpenTable is headquartered in San Francisco and available throughout the United States, as well as in Canada, Germany, Japan, Mexico, and the UK.

  10. OpenTable Names Jeff McCombs Chief Financial Officer

    Former Flipboard CFO and Facebook Global Head of Ad Business Operations will lead and scale OpenTable’s financial operations strategy globally


    LONDON, January 28th, 2016… OpenTable, the world’s leading provider of online restaurant reservations and part of The Priceline Group (NASDAQ: PCLN), today announced that Jeff McCombs has been appointed Chief Financial Officer.

    “Jeff is a dynamic executive with a strong track record of leading financial and business operations on a global scale,” said Christa Quarles, Chief Executive Officer of OpenTable.  “As we innovate on OpenTable’s mission of connecting restaurants and diners in more ways and locations around the world, Jeff has a great blend of entrepreneurial spirit and drive with the operational excellence needed to scale our business.”

    “As a longtime fan of the OpenTable brand and the value it delivers to diners and restaurants, I’m excited to work with Christa and the executive team to build upon the company’s success in the U.S. and other markets around the globe,” said Jeff McCombs.

    Prior to joining OpenTable, McCombs served as the Chief Financial Officer for Flipboard.  Previously, he served as the Global Head of Business Operations for Facebook’s ad business; Chief Financial Officer and Head of Corporate and Business Development for Tumri; and in various senior executive roles at Yahoo. He began his career as an investment banker at firms including Credit Suisse First Boston and Lehman Brothers.  He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Business Economics from the University of California, Los Angeles.

    —- ENDS —-

    For more information or to talk to an OpenTable spokesperson please contact:

    emma@housepr.com / 020 7291 3030

    abbie@housepr.com / 020 7291 3041

     

    www.opentable.co.uk

    www.facebook.com/OpenTableUK

    www.twitter.com/OpenTableUK